Jefferson Lab Science Series

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Science Series Video Archive

Couldn't make it to the last Science Series lecture? Did you like a lecture so much that you just had to see it again? Not to worry! Past lectures are now available on demand!

Tools, Techniques and Technology Connections of Particle Physics

Tools, Techniques and Technology Connections of Particle Physics

Particle physics shares with other basic sciences the need to innovate, invent and develop tools, techniques and technologies to carry out its mission to explore the nature of matter, energy, space and time. The story of invention in particle physics and the interplay between different fields of science and society will be illustrated in this colloquium. At the same time, particle physics, and curiosity driven fundamental research in general, that could advance scientific discovery and accelerate the pace of innovation...

April 2, 2014

Dr. Marcel Demarteau - Argonne National Lab

The Higgs Boson and Our Life

The Higgs Boson and Our Life

On July 4th, 2012, the ATLAS and CMS experiments operating at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) announced the discovery of a new particle compatible with the Higgs boson (hunted for almost 50 years), which is a crucial piece for our understanding of fundamental physics and thus the structure and evolution of the universe. This lecture describes the unprecedented instruments and challenges that have allowed such an accomplishment, the meaning and relevance of this discovery to physics...

April 30, 2013

Dr. Fabiola Gianotti - European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)

Guesstimating the Environment

Guesstimating the Environment

Paper or plastic? Gasoline or electric cars? Ethanol or gasoline? Local or imported food? We are constantly bombarded by environmental questions and by contradictory answers from "experts." This talk will show how you can cut through the fog of numbers to answer these questions for yourself, not precisely, but good enough. We will cover the principles of estimating, introduce the "Goldilocks" categories of answers, and then look at some of the big (and small) environmental questions of our time.

March 5, 2013

Dr. Lawrence Weinstein - Old Dominion University

The Origin of the Elements

The Origin of the Elements

The world around us is made of atoms. Did you ever wonder where these atoms came from? How was the gold in our jewelry, the carbon in our bodies, and the iron in our cars made? In this lecture, we will trace the origin of a gold atom from the Big Bang to the present day, and beyond. You will learn how the elements were forged in the nuclear furnaces inside stars, and how, when they die, these massive stars spread the elements into space.

November 13, 2012

Dr. Edward Murphy - University of Virginia, Department of Astronomy

You Already Know This Physics!

You Already Know This Physics!

From a research path that includes a little bit of rocket science, under sea measurements, radiation detection and measurement, space experimentation and two expeditions to the Antarctic, Mr. McKisson brings a different view of how much physics most people already know from observing the world around them. With a minimal amount of math, attendees will learn a little of the history of physics and may discover that they know more than they thought about what some view as an inscrutable subject.

October 9, 2012

Mr. Jack McKisson - Jefferson Lab, Detector and Imaging Group

Living and Working in the Freezer

Living and Working in the Freezer

Very little data of any kind exists from the early spring in the Arctic. The reason? It's extremely cold and that makes it difficult to survive, let alone conduct science. From March through the end of April, 2011, scientists from around the world braved temperatures of -48°C in the high Canadian Arctic in the name of science. At the Catlin Arctic Survey's floating 'Ice Base' off Ellef Ringnes Island, Dr. Victoria Hill was investigating...

February 7, 2012

Dr. Victoria Hill - Old Dominion University, Bio-Optics Group

Volcanoes in Virginia!

Volcanoes in Virginia!

The recent earthquake may have you wondering what other surprises Virginia's geology may hold. Could there be a volcanic eruption in Virginia? Probably not today, but during the Eocene, about 35-48 million years ago, a number of mysterious eruptions occurred in western Virginia. This talk investigates the possible origins of these eruptions, and what they can tell us about the crust and mantle underneath Virginia.

January 24, 2012

Dr. Elizabeth Baedke Johnson - James Madison University

Adventures in Infectious Diseases

Adventures in Infectious Diseases

Dr. Susan Fisher-Hoch, Virologist and Epidemiologist, will discuss her research and travels associated with viral hemorrhagic fevers. From the Ebola outbreak in Reston, Virginia to outbreaks of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in South Africa, Senegal, and Saudi Arabia, Dr. Fisher-Hoch has studied and tracked the pathophysiology of these viral diseases. These studies have led her from the Center for Disease Control in the United States, to Lyon, France...

November 1, 2011

Susan P. Fisher-Hoch, M.D. - The University of Texas School of Public Health

Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives

Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives

In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor...

October 25, 2011

Dr. Cynthia Keppel - Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute

The Science of Chocolate

The Science of Chocolate

Explore the chemistry of chocolate and how the chemistry relates to the flavor and effects of chocolate on the human body and why, even after 3,400 years of cocoa consumption, chocolate remains somewhat of a mystery.

April 19, 2011

Dr. Andy McShea - Theo Chocolate

DNA: The Strand That Connects Us All

DNA: The Strand That Connects Us All

Learn how the methods and discoveries of human population genetics are applied for personal genealogical reconstruction and anthropological testing. We will start with a short general review of human genetics and the biology behind this form of DNA testing. We will look at how DNA testing is performed and how samples are processed in our laboratory. We will also examine examples of personal genealogical results from Family Tree DNA and personal anthropological results from the Genographic Project...

March 29, 2011

Dr. Matt Kaplan - University of Arizona Genetics Core

The Mysterious Universe: Exploring Our World With Particle Accelerators

The Mysterious Universe: Exploring Our World With Particle Accelerators

The universe is dark and mysterious, more so than even Einstein imagined. While modern science has established deep understanding of ordinary matter, unidentified elements ("Dark Matter" and "Dark Energy") dominate the structure of the universe, its behavior and its destiny. What are these curious elements? We are now working on answers to these and other challenging questions posed by the universe with experiments at particle accelerators on Earth...

November 23, 2010

Dr. James E. Brau - University of Oregon

Einstein for Everyone

Einstein for Everyone

Young Einstein was a rebel who seemed doomed to fail. How did he overcome rejection to become the most famous scientist in history? We will discuss and explain all his theories in plain English and without math, and we will discover how Einstein's achievements impact our lives through DVDs, GPS, iPods, computers and green energy.

October 5, 2010

Dr. Robert Piccioni

The Restoration of the USS Monitor

The Restoration of the USS Monitor

The ongoing efforts to conserve and exhibit the iconic Civil War ironclad USS Monitor at The Mariners' Museum will be discussed. The presentation will cover past conservation accomplishments by conservators and NOAA specialists, current activities in the lab, and future plans to bring back to life one of the world's most famous warships. Learn about the complex methods and procedures used to treat the ship's revolving gun turret, steam engine...

March 2, 2010

David Krop - Conservation Project Manager, The Mariner's Museum

A TACT-ful Chemical Musical

A TACT-ful Chemical Musical

Eleven elaborate chemical demonstrations which are choreographed and set to popular music. These demonstrations are mixed with two or three numbers involving audience participation.

February 9, 2010

Tidewater Alliance of Chemistry Teachers

demo

Einstein's Biggest Blunder: A Cosmic Mystery Story

Einstein's Biggest Blunder: A Cosmic Mystery Story

Within a decade of adding a "Cosmological Constant" to his triumphant General Theory of Relativity in 1915, Einstein denigrated the addition as his "greatest blunder." In the last decade, however, new observations have led to a revolution in cosmology and a rethinking of Einstein's alleged blunder and its implications for understanding nature and life. In this World Year of Physics Lecture Series talk, Lawrence Krauss, director of the Center for Education and Research...

March 16, 2005

Lawrence Krauss - Case Western Reserve University

What's for Dinner?

What's for Dinner?

Just in time for Thanksgiving! Do you know what toxins may be lurking in your food? How are they produced and how harmful are they? Dr. Kristen Kulp, a cancer research scientist, will perform demonstrations to illustrate methods used to detect these food toxins. She will also describe quick and easy cooking techniques that will reduce the formation of these harmful compounds.

November 23, 2004

Dr. Kristen Kulp - Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

The Hidden World of Technology

The Hidden World of Technology

From the moment the clock radio comes on in the morning to the time we shut off the last light at night, a hidden web of technology - a labyrinth - supports and sustains us. Our speaker takes the first half hour of his day and shows the complex web of technology underlying it. In addition to the technical aspect, he explores the social, political, economic, and cultural context of the material things that surround us.

April 20, 2004

Dr. William Hammack - University of Illinois and National Public Radio

Understanding Flight: A Physical Description of How Airplanes Fly

Understanding Flight: A Physical Description of How Airplanes Fly

Did you ever wonder how a Boeing 747, weighing 910,000 lbs at takeoff can possibly get off the ground? Or, did you ever wonder how airplanes fly upside down? Why is there a "backside of the power curve?" What makes a wing efficient? These questions can be answered when lift is developed in terms of Newton's laws. A Newtonian description of lift gives an intuitive feel for how airplanes fly, without the need for complicated analysis or approximations...

March 23, 2004

Dr. Scott Eberhardt - University of Washington

The Physics of Stock Car Racing from a NASCAR Champion's Perspective

The Physics of Stock Car Racing from a NASCAR Champion's Perspective

A two-time NASCAR Champion will overview the physics of stock car racing from a driver's perspective. Topics will feature various technical aspects of stock car racing, such as, tires, mechanical suspension, aerodynamics and engines, with an emphasis on NASCAR-style cars.

March 9, 2004

Dr. Scott Winters - Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Worlds Beyond the Matrix

Worlds Beyond the Matrix

What do those huge canyons on Mars look like? What is waiting for us on the surfaces of the other planets in our solar system? What technologies are now being used to explore the depths of space? Learn about the exploration of space and see images gathered by probes and telescopes!

February 24, 2004

Nigel Hey - Science Author

The Physics of Baseball

The Physics of Baseball

From the energy supplied by the pitcher to the ball to the way the batter swings the bat to the path of the fly ball to center field, ways that physics can be applied to baseball to better understand and enjoy the game!

December 9, 2003

Dr. Robert Adair - Yale University

Strange Matters: Science Headlines from the 21st Century

Strange Matters: Science Headlines from the 21st Century

Antimatter, black holes and the expansion of the universe were all 'discovered' by physicists studying squiggles on paper. Now, predictions of strange quark matter, invisible stars and new dimensions of space and time set the stage for the biggest science headlines of the 21st century.

November 5, 2003

Tom Siegfried - Science Editor, The Dallas Morning News

Multi-Million Dollar Forgeries Exposed

Multi-Million Dollar Forgeries Exposed

A million dollar French impressionist painting or a worthless fake? Explore the techniques used by scientific detectives to distinguish between priceless documents and convincing forgeries.

October 7, 2003

Dr. Michael Henchman - Brandeis University

Comic Book Physics

Comic Book Physics

Even superheroes must obey the laws of physics - or do they? Exactly how much force does it take to leap a tall building in a single bound and what does that tell us about Superman's home planet? Did Spider-Man accidentally cause the death of the falling Gwen Stacy when he caught her with a web? Discover what's right - and wrong - with the physics in the world of comics.

March 25, 2003

Dr. Jim Kakalios - University of Minnesota

Hidden Worlds - Hunting for Quarks in Ordinary Matter

Hidden Worlds - Hunting for Quarks in Ordinary Matter

How can scientists know anything about quarks, particles which are 100,000 times smaller than atoms? How do quarks arrange themselves to make ordinary matter? Learn about the hidden world of quarks, the particles which are inside of everything, everywhere!

February 26, 2003

Dr. Timothy Paul Smith - Dartmouth College

Dinosaur Extinctions and Giant Asteroids

Dinosaur Extinctions and Giant Asteroids

The story of the Chicxulub impact crater, created 65 million years ago by the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs!

November 19, 2002

Dr. Kevin Pope - Geo Eco Arc Research, Aquasco, MD

Chemistry - It's More Than Puffs and Bangs!

Chemistry - It's More Than Puffs and Bangs!

A series of educational and entertaining demonstrations that convey the excitement of science in general and chemistry in particular.

October 29, 2002

Dr. Joe Schwarcz - McGill Office for Chemistry and Society, Montreal, Canada

demo

The Physics of Baseball

The Physics of Baseball

How a physicist thinks about baseball!

March 28, 2002

Dr. Alan Nathan - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Iceland: Dynamic Land of Ice and Fire

Iceland: Dynamic Land of Ice and Fire

Come and explore the geology and geography of this unique land.

February 8, 2002

Dr. Richard S. Williams Jr. - U.S. Geological Survey

The Science and Technology Behind Television

The Science and Technology Behind Television

Learn how your TV works and the changes that will come with Digital High Definition TV.

March 6, 2001

Mr. Paul Cummings - Newport News Public Schools

Molecules are Everywhere

Molecules are Everywhere

Chemistry experiments that demonstrate the existence and properties of molecules!

November 14, 2000

Dr. H. Alan Rowe - Norfolk State University

demo

New Light on Poison Mud

New Light on Poison Mud

Jefferson Lab's unique and expanding facilities are the platform for studies of contaminated soils and sediments.

October 17, 2000

Dr. Michael Kelley and Christine Conrad - College of William and Mary, Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Radiation: What is it and how can it affect me?

Radiation: What is it and how can it affect me?

Learn about different types of radiation, where it comes from, how it is detected and how it affects living cells.

March 14, 2000

Robert May, Scott Schwahn - Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Mars Missions and the Search for Life

Mars Missions and the Search for Life

How engineering is used to help scientists study the geology, climate and possibility of life on Mars.

February 15, 2000

Dr. Robert Mitcheltree - NASA Langley Research Center

Physics Circus

Physics Circus

Eye-popping experiments demonstrating the laws of physics!

October 12, 1999

Dr. Phil Cole - University of Texas, El Paso

demo

Which Way is Up?

Which Way is Up?

From spinning tops to polarized electrons, how you can become a polarized source expert in one easy lesson!

March 9, 1999

Dr. Scott Price - Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Holograms

Holograms

From Star Wars to credit cards, a discussion and demonstration on the inner workings of lasers and 3-D holograms.

February 9, 1999

Mr. Paul Christie - Liti Holographics

Clocks and Timekeeping

Clocks and Timekeeping

Learn about the physics of timekeeping and atomic clocks.

December 15, 1998

Dr. Christopher Ekstrom - U.S. Naval Observatory

Creating a Star on Earth

Creating a Star on Earth

Fusion is a potentially limitless source of energy. Can we make it work?

November 3, 1998

Dr. Andrew Post-Zwicker - Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Polymers, Foams and Gels

Polymers, Foams and Gels

From diapers to slime, see the many uses of these materials.

January 13, 1998

Dr. Tarek Sammakia and Dr. Gordon Yee - University of Colorado

demo

Adventures in Science

Adventures in Science

Eye-popping experiments that you shouldn't try at home!

November 18, 1997

Professor Cynthia Keppel with Mr. R. Neil Green and Mr. Tege Margues - Hampton University

demo

Physics IQ Test

Physics IQ Test

Predict the outcome of physics experiments and brain teasers!

October 15, 1997

Professor Richard Berg - University of Maryland

demo

Symmetry - From Kaleidoscopes to Theories of Everything and Nothing

Symmetry - From Kaleidoscopes to Theories of Everything and Nothing

How the idea of symmetry helps us understand the world.

April 29, 1997

Dr. Howard Georgi - Harvard University

Detecting Einstein's Gravity Waves

Detecting Einstein's Gravity Waves

LIGO - A project to build observatories for a new window on the universe.

March 18, 1997

Dr. David Shoemaker - Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Interactive Computer Games and Animation

Interactive Computer Games and Animation

Insights on creating and playing interactive games.

December 10, 1996

Ms. Stephanie Barish - Shoah Foundation

Mechanical Properties of Soda Cans

Mechanical Properties of Soda Cans

How heat and chemical treatments make aluminum alloys so useful and versatile.

October 23, 1996

Dr. Carolyn Meyers - North Carolina A&T State University

Space Shuttle Science

Space Shuttle Science

Repairing the Hubble Space Telescope and experimenting in space.

April 17, 1996

Dr. Kathryn C. Thornton - Astronaut, NASA Johnson Space Center

Atlantis in the Chesapeake?

Atlantis in the Chesapeake?

Understanding prehistoric archaeology and sea level change.

January 23, 1996

Dennis Blanton - The College of William and Mary

Interpreting Data from Particle Detectors

Interpreting Data from Particle Detectors

How we learn about subatomic particles and their interactions.

November 14, 1995

Dr. Gail Dodge - Old Dominion University

How Memory Works

How Memory Works

Information storage and transmission in the brain.

October 17, 1995

Dr. Charles F. Stevens - Salk Institute

Exploring the Microwave Universe

Exploring the Microwave Universe

Invisible microwaves from space provide clues for astrophysicists.

September 26, 1995

Dr. Jacqueline N. Hewitt - Massachusetts Institute of Technology

AIDS: The Science, The Impact

AIDS: The Science, The Impact

Answers to questions about AIDS: How, Why and How Not

April 4, 1995

Dr. Saundra H. Oyewole - Trinity College

Remote Control with Computers

Remote Control with Computers

Making hundreds of computers do your bidding - even from home!

March 14, 1995

Dr. Chip Watson - CEBAF

Waste: You Can't Just Throw It Away

Waste: You Can't Just Throw It Away

Cleaning up hazardous waste provides new challenges for today's scientists.

February 14, 1995

Jacqueline W. Sales - Hazardous and Medical Waste Services, Inc.

Earth on Fire: The Environmental Impact of Global Burning

Earth on Fire: The Environmental Impact of Global Burning

How human actions and activities affect the atmosphere.

January 11, 1995

Dr. Joel Levine - NASA Langely Research Center

Lowering the Boom!

Lowering the Boom!

Techniques for reducing the sonic boom of supersonic aircraft.

December 13, 1994

Dr. Christine Darden - NASA Langely Research Center

Collisions of Comets and Asteroids with Earth

Collisions of Comets and Asteroids with Earth

How much of a threat do these collisions pose today?

November 9, 1994

Dr. Christopher Chyba - National Security Council

Becoming Enlightened About Light

Becoming Enlightened About Light

How the use of light, especially laser light, entertains, heals, and helps us understand our world.

October 27, 1994

Dr. Michelle Shinn - Bryn Mawr College

Exploring Submarine Volcanoes - A New Frontier

Exploring Submarine Volcanoes - A New Frontier

Undersea voyages capture geology in action at mid-ocean ridges.

May 25, 1994

Dr. John Delaney - University of Washington

The World in a Glass of Soda Pop

The World in a Glass of Soda Pop

Dramatic and surprising demonstrations of physics with everyday objects.

April 19, 1994

Dr. Charles Hyde-Wright - Old Dominion University

demo

Oysters: A Chesapeake Controversy

Oysters: A Chesapeake Controversy

The science behind oyster breeding, cultivation and fishery management.

February 15, 1994

Dr. Mary C. Gibbons - McMullen Associates

Pollution Sleuthing Using an Accelerator

Pollution Sleuthing Using an Accelerator

Understanding air pollution using nuclear and atomic detective techniques.

January 11, 1994

Dr. Thomas A. Cahill - University of California

Cloning: The Science Behind Jurassic Park

Cloning: The Science Behind Jurassic Park

Learn the latest on genetics being discovered by the Human Genome Project.

December 7, 1993

Dr. Paula Gregory - University of Michigan

Finding Subatomic Particles at CEBAF

Finding Subatomic Particles at CEBAF

How physicists detect particles that can't be seen.

November 16, 1993

Dr. Keith Baker - Hampton University and CEBAF

Neutrinos: Much Ado About (Almost) Nothing

Neutrinos: Much Ado About (Almost) Nothing

Learn about nature's most elusive and nearly undectable particle.

September 28, 1993

Dr. Gina Rameika - Fermilab

Jellyfish: The Big Sting

Jellyfish: The Big Sting

Explore the world of jellyfish research with a marine scientist and learn about jellyfish, their sting, and their predators.

April 20, 1993

Dr. Karen Rowe - Hampton University

Avoiding Environmental Problems

Avoiding Environmental Problems

Are you worried about our planet's future? Environmental scientists do something about it.

December 2, 1992

Dr. Elizabeth Anderson - Clements International Corporation

Do You Remember When? 100,000 Years Ago on the Peninsula

Do You Remember When? 100,000 Years Ago on the Peninsula

How do we know about the Peninsula's prehistoric past? Learn how fossils give us a local history lesson.

October 21, 1992

Geology Professor Jerre Johnson - College of William and Mary

Microscopes and Telescopes - How Does the World Work?

Microscopes and Telescopes - How Does the World Work?

How do we learn about atoms and the universe?

September 30, 1992

Dr. Leon Lederman - Nobel Laureate

Physical Fitness for Athletes . . . and Everyone Else, Too

Physical Fitness for Athletes . . . and Everyone Else, Too

What constitutes physical fitness? How does the body keep in shape? Athletes especially will be interested in this overview by a sports medicine expert.

May 14, 1992

Dr. David N. Tornberg - Hampton Roads Orthopedic Associates

From Acne to Suntans: Dermatology for the Teenager

From Acne to Suntans: Dermatology for the Teenager

How does human skin do its job of protecting the body? What sorts of things can go wrong -- and what can be done when they do?

February 20, 1992

Dr. Susan E. Mackel, M.D. - Oyster Point Dermatology, Inc.

Magnets and Their Attractions for Technology

Magnets and Their Attractions for Technology

How do scientists and engineers use magnets? What do magnets promise for the future? See for yourself what's involved in tapping one of nature's fundamental forces: electromagnetism.

December 11, 1991

Dr. Leigh Harwood - CEBAF

Investigating Earth's Atmosphere

Investigating Earth's Atmosphere

Demonstrations of weather forecasting tools and techniques for experiments in the atmosphere and of lasers used to measure atmospheric trace gases and aerosols.

May 14, 1991

Mark Shipham, Scott Bachmeier, Scott Higdon, and Byron Meadows - NASA/Langley Research Center

Explore the World of Scientific Computing LIVE!

Explore the World of Scientific Computing LIVE!

Simulations and demonstrations of the human interface for real-time data acquisition, the capabilities and possibilities of computers and networking, and theoretical modeling of the physical universe.

March 6, 1991

Dr. Roy Whitney, Ms. Rita Chambers and Dr. Chip Watson - CEBAF

Is Something Wrong With the Weatherman?

Is Something Wrong With the Weatherman?

What makes weather forecasting so hard? How can computers help?

January 22, 1991

Dr. Mike Kaplan - North Carolina State University

Superconducting BAYCO Bits

Superconducting BAYCO Bits

What IS superconductivity, anyway? In sub-Antartic cold, strange things happen to the superconductor BArium Yttrium Copper Oxide.

December 12, 1990

Dr. Randy Caton and Dr. Fred Hartline - Christopher Newport University

Where's the Beach?

Where's the Beach?

The hows and whys of our disappearing beaches - severe storms, changing of the sea level, and shifting sand.

October 25, 1990

Dr. Suzette Kimball - VIMS Associate Marine Scientist

What Is CEBAF All About?

What Is CEBAF All About?

An overview of CEBAF's purpose and technology.

September 27, 1990

Dr. Beverly Hartline and Kathryn Strozak - CEBAF

The Ultimate Speed

The Ultimate Speed

In his youth, Dr. William Bertozzi, an MIT professor who has long been a leader in experimental nuclear physics using beams of electrons, carried out an experiment in which he explored the relationship between the velocity of electrons and their kinetic energy by measurements over a range of accelerating voltages between 0.5 MeV and 15 MeV. The kinetic energy is measured using calorimetry and the velocity is measured by time-of-flight. This educational film, made in 1962, documents the experiment...

Sometime in 1962

Dr. William Bertozzi - Massachusetts Institute of Technology